News: Mathematical Quilting

Mathematical Quilting

Mathematical Quilting

I got hooked on origami sometime after Math Craft admin Cory Poole posted instructions for creating modular origami, but I had to take a break to finish a quilt I've been working on for a while now. It's my first quilt, and very simple in its construction (straight up squares, that's about it), but it got me thinking about the simple geometry and how far you could take the design to reflect complex geometries. Below are a few cool examples I found online.

I never really thought about the tie to math, and what a homage the quilt is to the mathematical shape. Travis over at Komplexify does a good job elaborating on this. First, he shows a fairly typical looking quilt:

Mathematical Quilting

And then he delves into complexities that are a bit beyond me (forgive me… ironically I'm rather math illiterate, but since obtaining a BFA in textiles / print design, I've grown pretty fascinated with repitition, geometry, etc.). Travis says:

"Note that the design of the whole quilt is merely a tiling of the plane by a single square design, sequentially rotated and/or reflected. Even more, the basic "atomic" square, called a log cabin in quilter's terms, is actually a nice proof without words that the sum of consecutive odd numbers is always a perfect square; here is a proof with words demonstrating the general idea with applets…

Mathematical Quilting

Further inspection shows that the "top-stitching"—the threading used to connect the top patterns to the back of the quilt through the padding—takes the form of very basic polar rose curves of the from  and $r=\cos(2t)$."

Mathematical Quilting

Cory, maybe you can explain… or maybe I'll just let it float over my head. Regardless, here are more mathematically inspired quilts that I found interesting.

Mathematical Quilting

Mathematical Quilting

Mathematical Quilting

Mathematical Quilting

Mathematical Quilting


5 Comments

they are amazing. the first one - "a piece of hyperspace" is a representation of a compound of five cubes - which is a truly beautiful shape. but to get it onto a quilt - fantastic. Any I would be terrified of hanging something so beautiful outside - I be afraid of vengeful pigeons (londons bane) and thieves.

That's a cool realization. It actually seems like if you combine several of George Hart's Slide together constructions just right you could this shape as depicted. I see intersections of equilateral triangles, squares, and regular pentagons. Check out this post and of course the pictures of the 30 square version that you put together here

You'd have to swap the directions for the pentagon slide together... Hmmm...

If you look further down my post of the 30 intersecting squares you will see I posted a picture (crumby quality) of a card model of 5 intersecting cubes there and it is very similar. I think the equilateral triangles are artistic license - but they sure look good! I didn't try the interlocking pentagons - will have a bash at it

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